Fifty Shades of Grey

In search for that captivating summer read, Richard and Judy’s Book Club is often where I start, but with the growing almost underground popularity of British author E.L. James, Fifty Shades of Grey was the first on list to get stuck into.

The explicit content and erotic storyline has lead most to read book in secret, but the increased interest in the first instalment of the Fifty Shades trilogy, has encouraged more to openly talk about the hidden world of BDSM.

Set in Seattle, it follows a newly graduate college student Anastasia Steale, who experiences an awkward interview with a handsome, young successful business man Christian Grey, that she thought would never lead to a second meeting. The pair embarks on an enchanting relationship testing each other’s limits, exposing secrets and naivety to the sensual scenes.

The passionate descriptive prose is broken up by email-structured conversations between the lead characters, as their journey into a dangerous connection, makes this page turning novel an instant best seller.

Its consequence books: Fifty Shades Darker and Fifty Shades Freed promise to further explore the dark side of sexual tendencies.

Having long awaited the next Victoria Hislop novel, Richard and Judy’s Book Club summer reads present The Thread.

Both previous books The Island and The Return leaves me with high expectations for this Greek adventure into the countries untold past.

Lastly it was nice to see a very apt, Jubilee by Shelley Harris featured as a Jackie Magpie ‘Book By Its Cover’ in the 10 recommended reads. Find the rest of the Summer 2012 list here.

Hunger Games

“Ladies and gentlemen, let the Seventy-fourth Hunger Games begin!”

In a dark vision of the near future, set in a rebuild metropolitan that has superseded the downfall of North American, its centre Capitol holds the dominant power over the other twelve residing districts.

To demonstration the nation of Panam’s control and to remind the districts that their lives lay in the hands of the ruling Capitol command. Two tributes, one boy and girl, from each of the starved districts, are forced to appear in a live TV show where winning will make you famous but losing means certain death.

Katniss Everdeen volunteers as tribute in place of her younger sister, as she is transformed, presented and trained to compete in the annual 74th Hunger Games.

Having supported and provided for her family by poaching and hunting in the restricted woods after her father’s death, Katniss gives hope to her district twelve as she enters the arena as ‘the world will be watching ‘ to battle to the death.

Entitled ‘The Girl on Fire’ Katniss confronts her components, in a journey of friendship, defiance, survival and a fight with imminent loss.

Having watched the trailer, my immediate reaction was to pick up the first in the Hunger Games trilogy. Being dubbed the next Twilight, the series’ narrative runs deeper then a teenage love-triangle exploring a disturbing future.

Of course I was at the front of the film’s preview showing to see the long awaited arrival of the Hunger Games, my preparation may have been a little extreme with flaming nails and Mockingjay pin on display.

The Hunger Games met all my expectations of the Suzanne Collins novel, with incredible casting, vivid imagery, and the story staying really true to the book, with obvious cues to the next to sequels.

“Happy Hunger Games! And may the odds be ever in your favour!”

One Day…

Twenty years, Two people

Under strict orders, One Day is packed ready for a visit home and a delivery to the Mother (There is always something lovely about sharing stories with loved ones, literature is something that’s better discussed with friends)

Having gained huge popularity through the release of Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgees’ version, I thought I would not have time to read the David Nicholls novel before seeing the film. But the minute I unwrapped this Birthday present, it was a page turner that I couldn’t put down.

I truly connected with the inter-linking relationship of two best friends which with every chapter, the longing for them to finally be together grew. Meeting Dexter and Emma every St Swithin’s Day (July 15) gave the book a real element of uncertainty and surprise at each stage.

A beautiful story touching on issues which I hadn’t ever really read in such a sensitive way, the personal account of drink, drugs, loss and love. How true friendships can develop into the strongest of love, and its power to overcome all else.

One Day, has become my favourite book of the year, get yourself lost in the maze of emotions and expect that life sometimes doesn’t have those fairytale endings but embrace the beginnings that do.

“Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.” – Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

In 2003 the BBC compiled it’s The Big Read characterising the nation’s top 100 best-loved novels. Having only read 11 of recommended books, I decided I would ditch the trashy chick lits (a must have for poolside reading) for some classics, widening my literacy education.

My Bookcase

Starting with Catcher in the rye by J. D. Salinger I was intrigued by discovering accounts from different eras, expressing insights and struggles which could be faced on a daily basis. Since having a change of genre, I’ve also read; Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D. H Laurence, Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Persuasion by Jane Eyre.

I was lucky to find HMV selling Collins Classics for £1, managing to reach the till with arms laden full of paperbacks.

With Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte being the last, I’m eager to watch the film adaptation which was release today. (Friday September 9)

 

The trailer promises to convey the raw and haunting progression through Jane’s difficult life. Remaining true to her strong and determined nature through an unloved childhood, and as she falls for her daunting master Mr Rochester. Cast: Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins, Imogen Poots, Tamzin Merchant.

I extremely enjoyed Jane Eyre- without any airs and graces, she battles internal moral issues and hidden secrets to find the love she’d always longed for.